Turing at 2012 Olympics: The “Turing Marathon”?

Days to Centenary:  264

As Turing cognoscente will know, Alan Turing was not exclusively cerebral.  He was a world-class long-distance runner who was known to run from Bletchley Park (where he worked on breaking Nazi codes during World War II) to London — a distance of more than 60 kilometres — when he was needed for meetings there.  When Britain hosted the Olympics in 1948, Turing came fifth in trials for the British marathon team.  Now the Olympics are coming back to London.

Turing running

Turing running

John Graham-Cumming — programmer, blogger, and author of The Geek Atlasled the successful campaign to obtain an apology from the British government for its treatment of Turing (full text here).  Last year Graham-Cumming began a new campaign, trying to get the marathon in the London 2012 Olympics named the “Turing Marathon.”

See Graham-Cumming’s Guardian article here.

Turing-o-philes would benefit from following Graham-Cumming’s career even when it’s not crossing paths with Alan Turing’s.  One of the latest projects he’s involved with is Plan 28.  This is a project to — at long last — actually build the analytical engine proposed by Charles Babbage in 1837, almost exactly 100 years prior to Turing’s first formulation of an “automatic machine” in 1937, later to become known as a “Turing machine.”

You can find a good interview with Graham-Cumming about the Geek Atlas and the campaign for a government apology to Turing on the Shift Run Stop podcast episode from 16/12/2010, here.

You can hear an excellent interview with him regarding Plan 28 on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation podcast CBC Spark Plus from 03/10/2011, here.

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This entry was posted in apology, John Graham-Cumming, Olympics, Running. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Turing at 2012 Olympics: The “Turing Marathon”?

  1. Pingback: Turing at 2012 Olympics II: Robot to Carry Olympic Torch? | The Turing Centenary

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